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CAN SMALL WEB SITES WITH LOW DOMAIN AUTHORITY OUTPERFORM BIG SITES ON GOOGLE?

CAN SMALL WEB SITES WITH LOW DOMAIN AUTHORITY OUTPERFORM BIG SITES ON GOOGLE?

With Google regularly announcing new updates to basic algorithms , one of the most common things I hear from independent publishers is their concern that search results are increasingly dominated by large sites . It is feared that small and medium-sized companies will lose the ability to compete over time with giants like Wikipedia or fast-growing brands like Buzzfeed or Mashable.
Large sites obviously have much higher domain authority - a measure of the industry's age, credibility and size of websites - than smaller sites. This raises the question: "Can small sites with weak domain authority outperform large sites? "
While we may still find examples of a small site appearing above a larger site in some Google search results, most publishers believe that larger sites are becoming more of a staple at the top. of all search results.
Below, I will explain why the data shows that this is probably not the case. In addition, I will share some details about why small sites might have an advantage over larger sites and how publishers can maximize this advantage to the best of their ability.
I break it down on Ezoic Explains

DO MAJOR WEBSITES DOMINATE GOOGLE SEARCH RESULTS?

While it may seem that big sites are still leading the Google search results, the truth is that search results are becoming more diverse every year. This means that larger sites are losing more real estate every year to smaller sites, mid-sized sites, rich clips, video content and other types of search results.

Confirmation bias is probably one of the reasons why many people mistakenly believe that big sites are becoming more common at the top of Google's search results. As we can see above, a simple search for a high volume query leads us to a search engine results page (SERP) filled with large sites with high Moz domain authority scores.
There are several reasons why it is common to see this, but one of the most obvious is that large sites rank very well for many keywords and it is likely that the searcher sees the same site at the top of the list. many different results.


In 2018, small and medium-sized sites that competed directly with Alexa's top 1,000 sites experienced an average 34% increase in organic traffic. In addition, these sites produced about 1/8 of the new content while adding more than 1,312 new organic keywords during the year.
In the results of the study we shared above, we found that the top 1,000 Alexa publishers saw an average 14% drop in organic website traffic (mostly from Google). Less than 20% of these major publishers have not grown. In fact, most of them have seen their rankings of organic keywords fall by about 26%.
This means that it is increasingly likely that publishers with weak domain authority scores will continue to disrupt major brands with more domain and page authority.

WHAT IS DOMAIN AUTHORITY AND HOW IMPORTANT IS IT?

Domain authority is a concept based on the language inside one of Google's original search patents. Google has invented an expression known as PageRank to describe its exclusive measure of a site's authority over a topic and its credibility in classifying that content accordingly. This has spread to the SEO industry as many SEO experts and software companies have used the patent filing to compile their own composition. This included domain age metrics, backlinks, existing content rankings, and more.
moz domain authority
The SEO software provider, Moz, has since established one of the most known and referenced domain authority scores Publishers can install the Moz Chrome extension for free and easily see the domain and page authority scores - as calculated by Moz's particular methodology - in the search results and on the pages they view.
It is very important to point out that Google does not share any externally rated or domain authority criteria. Third parties, like Moz, are mere reverse engineering specialists who give their best estimate of the kind of things Google is considering to establish a domain authority and assign an indexed score to that criterion.
Moz's domain authority score has no effect on the current ranking of sites in search results. In addition, the impact of the domain and page authority of site rankings seems to vary greatly depending on the search query. There are a number of assumptions about why this might work this way, but it seems that domain authority is not massively important for some search queries but could be a major factor for other.

We've talked about domain authority before and why it's a concept in which it's worth investing time and energy improvement; however, things like domain age, backlinks, and existing rankings are not things that publishers can usually affect quickly.

HOW CAN SITES WITH LOWER DOMAIN AUTHORITY COMPETE?

Our study of leading brand publishers allowed us to draw some interesting conclusions that directly competed with small publishers in terms of results. One of the biggest differences is the content itself. On average, small publishers usually wrote longer content that dive deeper into specific topics. In addition, many of the results of smaller publishers included titles with the phrases "how to" or "who is".

The big publishers had a lot more backlinks and included much longer titles for a lot of their content. In addition, they often featured a lot of rich media like videos, slideshows, and image galleries that contributed to the drop in the number of words overall.
A recent study by Backlinko could help us better understand why these small publishers often have content that exceeds that of major publishers. In the study, you can see that longer and more complex titles will often give better results on social media, but not as good in Google search. Yet "how-to" articles will often receive much better quality backlinks for specific articles (giving small publishers a necessary advantage in an area in which they would normally struggle to compete with major publishers).

Finally, we see that the most successful types of securities on social platforms are not as good at organic research.
What does this have to do with large publishers whose organic search traffic is disrupted by small publishers? Many things in fact.
Large publishers have a much larger audience and often think of the diversity of traffic beyond Google search. They try to increase the number of newsletter, connected users, subscribers, social followers, and more. It means creating content that attracts the public on many platforms outside of research. This broad scope allows small publishers to focus on content that is designed and optimized for Google search.
This essentially gives small publishers a unique advantage when it comes to competing for a ranking position in search results compared to major publishers.

WHAT CAN PUBLISHERS DO WITH THIS INFORMATION?

I think one of the most important things to remove from this data is that if you're a small or medium-sized publisher, there's no reason to believe that big publishers or other high domain authority sites will push your site out of search results. In fact, it is more likely that Google itself will push your results out of the search page ; rather than another publisher.
No matter if you are a big publisher or a small publisher, there are probably a few things that the data tells us you can do to make sure that you maintain a successful keyword ranking and organic growth in traffic ....

1.) STRATEGICALLY CREATE DETAILED CONTENT AND EXPERTLY WRITE

Each article does not have to be 5,000 words on a topic or theme. However, your content is your most important asset in your efforts to obtain a higher ranking in the search results.
Is this the best result for the queries you are targeting?
Does the title reflect an element that researchers would click to answer their search?
Is the content sufficiently detailed to answer all forms of the question - and any other long-term iteration?

By typing the query to Google and reviewing the "people ask too" boxes, you can help formulate additional H2s and paragraphs, images, and topics that you might want to cover in an article. You can even find entire sections of content that could help you write a better article or discover other affiliate revenue opportunities .

2.) WORRY LESS ABOUT BACKLINKS AND DOMAIN AUTHORITY

If there's one thing this study has taught me a lot is that backlinks continue to be overrated. It's not at all to say that they are not important for SEO. Backlinks are particularly difficult to obtain and measure in an objectively healthy way for your website.
While there are certainly publishers and webmasters who have built backlinks quickly and efficiently, one of the best ways to move forward in research is to focus on producing content from data .

3.) WRITE CONTENT FOR YOUR AUDIENCE

Many of the major publishers seem to have difficulty maintaining a form of research-based content production. This is often why small publishers can create content that is better for researchers. Thinking strategically can help you stay one step ahead.
Although this goes back to point 1 on maintaining a data-driven approach to content production, it's also important to keep in mind who you're writing for. I'm not only talking about people who read, but also the platform on which they will discover your content.
People who use Google often look for answers rather than something interesting to read.
Someone looking for answers is much more likely to click on a title like, "How to properly bathe a cat" rather than "9 ways to NOT wash your cat" (as appealing as it sounds).

WHY IS IT IMPORTANT TO UNDERSTAND THE AUTHORITY AND RANKING OF THE DOMAIN?

In 2017, I knew a popular publisher who was convinced that Google was offering more and better results to the big sites in their niche. They had specialized in digital marketing before owning several publishing houses and were convinced that they needed to change their strategy.
After two months of declining organic traffic, they decided to convert all their main organic landing pages into slide shows to better capitalize on Facebook's growing traffic.

Since 2017, the organic reach of Facebook since the publisher pages has decreased by about 150%. This publisher watched organic traffic reach its lowest point after the change. Meanwhile, the traffic on Facebook has decreased as the scope has been reduced by the platform.
This publisher finally saw his earnings reduced to 1/6 of what they were before the change. Their decision was based on a false premise and it cost them dearly.
On the other side of the spectrum, Saul McLeod, an independent publisher from SimplyPsychology.org, has always been a psychologist and university professor. He has launched a site with little knowledge of online publishing and has uploaded his articles on psychology, written by experts, on his site over time. During this period, the Saul site has grown exponentially and generally surpasses sites like Wikipedia and other leading brand publications for high volume search queries.


WILL SMALL SITES STILL BE ABLE TO OUTCLASS THE BIGGER ONES?

It's hard to say for sure. So far, Google has tended to index a growing number of sites each year. This means more potential results overall. In addition, this was accompanied by a trend in which results continued to diversify from a small number of large sites engulfing all of Google's organic search traffic.
This has actually forced some big publishers to wonder if Google can cap the traffic they are willing to send on certain websites .
Regardless of the type of publisher you are, the above data is more representative of the types of content sought by Google than the types of sites it seeks to rank. Publishers who create content for research are most likely to continue to benefit from it. This means writing content for people who use the search engines, not for the search engines themselves.

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